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Life Insurance Creditor Protection By State [Is Your Cash Value and Death Benefit Covered?]

life insurance protected from creditors

Cash Value Life Insurance Creditor Protection and Bankruptcy Protection By State

Whole life policies offer numerous benefits beyond just providing liquidity in the event of an untimely death.

Over time, a policy’s cash surrender value builds up, earning interest and serving as a versatile financial asset useful in retirement and estate planning.

With guaranteed cash value growth rates, whole life provides portfolio stability and a hedge against market uncertainty.

Creditor Protection

Just as importantly (and often overlooked), whole life policies also offer the benefit of protection against creditor claims.

In general, when a creditor obtains a judgment or when a debtor files bankruptcy, the debtor’s assets can be “attached” to satisfy debts.  An attached asset is seized and liquidated, and the proceeds are applied to creditor claims.

However, every state has exemption laws identifying certain asset categories which are immune, or partially immune, from attachment.

The classic example is the “homestead exemption” protecting a debtor’s primary residence, but the cash value and death benefits of life insurance policies are also exempt – in whole or in part – in nearly every state.

How Do Life Insurance Exemptions Work Against Creditors?

Exemption laws vary considerably between states and don’t apply to the IRS, but, in general, if a creditor obtains a judgment against a policyholder, the creditor cannot attach a whole life policy’s cash value to satisfy the judgment up to the amount of the exemption.

It doesn’t matter if the judgment arises from a contract claim (like an unpaid loan) or a tort action (like negligence or premises liability), the cash value will survive attachment up to the amount of the exemption.

This makes whole life insurance assets a useful means of ensuring a level of financial protection, even when other assets are potentially exposed.

Varies Among States

Some states offer complete exemptions for life insurance.  So, the dollar amount the policy is worth is irrelevant – the entire cash value is exempt.

In other states, exemption amounts are capped, which means cash value is exempt up to the amount of the cap, but the excess is attachable.

In the majority of states, life insurance exemption laws have one or more conditions.

Commonly, the beneficiary of the policy must be a third party (i.e., someone other than the policyowner) for the cash value to be held as exempt.

Exclusions Exist

And there are exclusions to exemptions under certain circumstances.

For instance, if a court finds that life insurance was purchased for the purpose of defrauding creditors – or if the claim asserted against the policyowner is a domestic support obligation – exemptions usually won’t be available.

If a policy’s cash value is pledged as collateral for a loan, it won’t be exempt from the claims of that specific creditor.

Life Insurance Exemptions in Bankruptcy

When an individual files bankruptcy, the court appoints a trustee to take control over all of the bankruptcy debtor’s assets (the “bankruptcy estate”).  Then, the trustee attaches and liquidates assets to pay creditor claims.

When the bankruptcy case concludes, almost all debts are discharged, but the assets attached by the trustee are gone.

Exempt assets like life insurance, though, are held outside of the bankruptcy estate and therefore not subject to attachment.

BK Protections Often Similar to Creditor Protections

In most states, the exemptions applicable to bankruptcy are the same as creditor exemptions, though a few use a different standard in bankruptcy cases.

A majority of states only allow bankruptcy debtors to use state exemptions, though twenty states – including New York, Pennsylvania, and Texas – allow debtors to choose either state or federal exemptions (but not both).

Federal Exemptions

Under the federal exemptions, whole life cash value can be held as exempt up to $13,400.

The variance between state exemption rules – and the choice between federal and state exemptions – can make a significant difference in the amount of wealth that survives a bankruptcy case.

Florida does not allow debtors to choose the federal rules, but the unlimited exemptions for both life insurance and homesteads make Florida one of the most favorable forums for bankruptcy filers.

Connecticut, on the other hand, limits the cash-value exemption to $4,000 but allows filers to choose between state or federal exemptions, potentially allowing preservation of nearly $10,000 in additional cash value if federal exemptions are claimed.

Exemption of Life Insurance Death Benefits

Most states also allow exemption of life insurance policy proceeds.  The exemption sometimes requires that proceeds be payable to a third-party beneficiary, but some states exempt death benefits even if payable to the insured’s estate.

As with cash value, there can be conditions for exemption of policy proceeds.  In New York, for instance, policy proceeds cannot be attached by a beneficiary’s creditors if the beneficiary is the insured’s spouse.

Notably, life insurance proceeds paid to a third party automatically transfer at death and are therefore not included within an insured decedent’s estate.

As a result, third-party pay-outs are usually not subject to creditor estate claims but are sometimes subject to attachment by creditors of the beneficiary – depending upon the applicable state law.

ILIT

Additional protections against creditors of both insured and beneficiary can be gained through an irrevocable life insurance trust (ILIT).

An ILIT owns a policy during the insured’s life and then, upon death, a trustee administers the proceeds in accordance with directions provided by the grantor of the trust in the trust’s declaration.

Because an ILIT is irrevocable, policy benefits are not included in the insured’s taxable estate for federal estate tax purposes.

Survey of State Life Insurance Exemption Laws

As mentioned above, there are substantial differences in the life insurance exemptions available throughout the fifty states.

A sizeable majority provide an unlimited exemption for a policy’s cash value, though most of those have one or more conditions.

The most common condition is that the policy’s beneficiary must not be the policyowner.

Florida offers one of the most generous exemption schemes, with an unlimited cash-value exemption for Florida residents regardless of beneficiary and full exemption of policy proceeds as long as the beneficiary is a third party.

Only New Hampshire and Washington do not provide some cash-value exemption for an insured policyowner, but both states permit filers to apply the federal exemption rules.

Cash Value Life Insurance Creditor Protection and Bankruptcy Protection By State

Disclaimer: We believe the current table of creditor protections by state is accurate. However, this table is not legal advice and you should consult with an attorney in your state if you have any questions regarding the below information.

StateExemption Amount (Cash Value)Exemption ConditionsExemption Same for BK and Creditors?Exemption of Death Benefits
AlabamaUnlimitedComplete exemption if spouse and/or children named beneficiary of policy.  Value of policy owned by insured’s spouse is also protected. Ala. Code §6-10-8, §27-14-29(b).Yes. Creditors of insured / policy owner cannot attach if beneficiary of policy is not owner or insured individual. Al. Code §27-14-29.
Alaska
$500,000Exemption of accrued dividends and loan value exceeding $500,000.  Amounts over $500,000 may be attached via court order.  AK. Stat. 09.38.025(a).Only certain state exemptions allowed in BK.  Includes cash value exemption.Beneficiary can exempt proceeds from claims of beneficiary creditors up to $473 per week if debtor is spouse or dependent of insured. AK. Stat. 09.38.30(e)(4).
ArizonaUnlimitedCash value exempt if named beneficiary of policy is spouse, close relative, or other dependent family member of insured for uninterrupted period of at least two years. A.R.S. §20-1131(D).Yes.Creditors of insured / policy owner cannot attach if beneficiary of policy is not owner or insured individual.  A.R.S. §20-1131(A).

Proceeds exempt from claims of beneficiary creditors up to $20,000 if beneficiary is insured’s spouse or child. A.R.S. §33-1126(A)(1).
ArkansasUnlimited; $500 if attachment based on contractual claim.Unlimited exemption set forth by statute restricted by Arkansas Constitution provisions limiting exemption available against contractual claims of creditors to $500.  AR. Code 16-66-209; Fed. Sav. & Loan Ins. Co. v. Holt, 894 F.2d 1005 (8th Cir.  1990).Yes.  (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Creditors of insured / policy owner cannot attach if beneficiary of policy is not owner or insured individual. AR. Code §23-79-131(a)(1).

Proceeds exempt from claims of beneficiary creditors, except if creditor claim is based on contractual debt, in which case exemption limited to $500. AR. Code §16-66-209.
California$15,650 (may be doubled if debtor is married)$15,650 exemption against execution pursued by judgment creditor applies to loan value of unmatured policy.  Cal. Civ. Pro. §704.100(b).Yes. Beneficiary creditors cannot attach proceeds to extent necessary to provide for care of beneficiary or beneficiary’s spouse and/or children.  Cal. Civ. Pro. §704.100(c).
Colorado$250,000Cash surrender value exempt if policy owned by debtor for at least four years.  Does not include increases arising from “extraordinary” contributions during prior four years.  Co. Stat. §13-54-102(l)(1)(A).Yes.Creditors of insured cannot attach if beneficiary of policy is not insured’s estate. Co. Rev. Stat., §13-54-102.
Connecticut$4,000Cash value exemption if policy owned by debtor and policy insures debtor or individual upon whom debtor is dependent. Ct. Gen. Stat. §52-352b(s).Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Creditors of insured cannot attach if beneficiary of policy is not insured’s estate.  Ct. Gen. Stat. §38a-453(a).
DelawareUnlimitedComplete exemption available for any assets or amounts held or payable to the debtor under any life insurance policy. Del. Code §10-4915.Yes.Proceeds exempt from claims of beneficiary creditors which existed as of time policy proceeds become available to beneficiary.  Del. Code §18-2725.
District of ColumbiaUnlimitedComplete exemption of any unmatured life insurance policy owned by debtor except policy intended to pay debts of debtor.  D.C.A. §15-501Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Creditors of insured / policy owner cannot attach if beneficiary has insurable interest and is not owner or insured individual.  D.C.A. §31-4716.

Proceeds exempt from claims of beneficiary creditors if dependent of insured and necessary for support.  D.C.A. §15-501.
FloridaUnlimitedCash value of life insurance policy insuring Florida resident or citizen may not be attached by creditor of insured.  Fla. Stat. §222.14Yes. Creditors of insured Florida resident cannot attach if beneficiary of policy is not insured or insured’s estate.  Fla. Stat. §222.13.
GeorgiaUnlimitedCash value of life insurance policy insuring Georgia resident or citizen may not be attached by creditor of insured.  O.C.G.A. §33-25-11(c).Generally, yes.  But cash value exemption in bankruptcy capped at $2,000.  O.C.G.A. §44-13-100(a)(9)Creditors of insured Georgia resident cannot attach if beneficiary of policy is not insured or insured’s estate.  O.C.G.A. §33-25-11(a).
HawaiiUnlimitedComplete exemption of cash value if beneficiary is insured’s spouse, child, parent, or dependent.  Haw. Rev. Stat. §431:10-232.Yes.  (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions)Creditors of insured cannot attach death benefits.  Haw. Rev. Stat. §431:10-232.
IdahoUnlimitedComplete exemption of cash value of policy owned by debtor, except value attributable to premiums paid in six months prior to bankruptcy filing or attachment.  ID Code §11-605.Yes. Creditors of insured cannot attach if beneficiary of policy is not insured or insured’s estate.

Creditors of beneficiary other than insured cannot attach.  ID Code §41-1833.
IllinoisUnlimitedComplete exemption of cash value if beneficiary is insured’s spouse, child, parent, or dependent.  735 ILCS 5/12-1001Yes.Creditors of beneficiary dependent upon insured cannot attach to extent proceeds necessary for support.  735 ILCS 5/12-1001.
IndianaUnlimitedComplete exemption of cash value if payable to insured’s spouse, child, parent or dependent.  Ind. Code §27-1-12-14(e).

Exemption excludes attachment of premium paid within one year of attachment or bankruptcy filing.  Ind. Code §27-1-12-14(f).
Yes.Creditors of insured cannot attach if beneficiary of policy is insured’s spouse, child, parent, or dependent.  Ind. Code §27-1-12-14(e).

If policy issued by domestic life insurance company prohibits assignment of benefits, creditors of beneficiary cannot attach proceeds unless beneficiary paid for policy. Ind. Code §27-2-5-1.
IowaUnlimited, except to extent cash value increases from payments made in last two years exceed $10,000.Complete exemption of cash value if payable to insured’s spouse, child, parent or dependent.  Exemption limited to $10,000 in value acquired during prior two years.  Exemption excludes premiums paid over necessary premiums during past two years.  Iowa Code §627.6(6).Yes.Creditors of insured cannot attach if beneficiary of policy is insured’s spouse, child, or dependent.  Iowa Code §627.6(6).

Proceeds exempt up to $15,000 from creditors of beneficiary if spouse, child, or dependent.  Iowa Code §627.6(6)(c).
KansasUnlimitedComplete exemption if beneficiary has insurable interest and policy not issued within past year.  KS Stat. §40-414(a).Yes.Creditors of insured and creditors of beneficiaries cannot attach if beneficiary has insurable interest.  KS Stat. §40-414(a).
KentuckyUnlimitedMoney or benefit under insurance policy cannot be attached for payment of any debt or liability of policyholder.  Ky. Stat. §427.110(1).Yes.  (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Creditors of insured or owner cannot attach if beneficiary is not insured or owner.  Creditors of beneficiary as of pay-out date cannot attach.  Ky. Stat. §427.110(1).
LouisianaUnlimitedCash value exempt from claims of creditors of insured or owner of policy.  La. Rev. Stat. §22:912(A)(1).

Limited to $35,000 if policy issued less than nine months prior to judgment execution or bankruptcy filing.  La. Rev. Stat. §22:912(A)(2).
Yes.Death benefits exempt against claims of creditors of insured, owner of policy, and beneficiaries as of time proceeds available to beneficiary.  La. Rev. Stat. §22:912(A)(1).
Maine$4,000Cash value exemption limited to $4,000; available if debtor is insured or person on whom insured is dependent.  14 M.R.S. §1422(11).Yes.Creditors of insured / owner cannot attach if beneficiary is not insured / owner or estate.

Creditors of beneficiary cannot attach to the extent claims exist at time proceeds of policy become available to beneficiary. 24-A M.R.S. §2428(2).
MarylandUnlimitedCash Value is exempt against claims of creditors of insured if beneficiary of policy is insured’s spouse, child, or other dependent relative.  Md. Ins. Code §16-111(a).

Exemption does not include dividends if debtor elects to accept dividends in cash.  Md. Ins. Code §16-111(b).
Yes.Death benefits exempt against claims of creditors of insured if beneficiary of policy is insured’s spouse, child, or other dependent relative.  Md. Ins. Code §16-111(a).

Policy proceeds exempt from claims of beneficiary’s creditors.  Md. Courts & Jud. Pro. §11-504(b)(2).
MassachusettsUnlimitedCash value is exempt if beneficiary’s interest in proceeds would be exempt (i.e., beneficiary has “insurable interest”). 175 Mass. Code §125; see also In re Sloss, 279 B.R. 6 (2002).Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Proceeds exempt from claims of insured’s creditors if has insurable interest.  175 Mass. Code §125.

Exempt from beneficiary creditors if policy prohibits assignment or attachment, or if beneficiary is spouse.  175 Mass. Code §119A, 126.
MichiganUnlimitedCash value fully exempt from insured’s creditors if beneficiary has insurable interest.  Mich. Comp. Laws §500.2207(2).Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Policy proceeds exempt from claims of insured’s creditors. Mich. Comp. Laws §500.2207.
Minnesota$9,600Cash value exemption if insured is debtor or individual upon whom debtor is dependent.  Minn. Stat. §550.37(23).Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Policy proceeds exempt against claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is not insured / owner.  Minn. Stat. §61A.12(1). 

Exempt up to $48,000 against claims of beneficiary creditors if beneficiary is spouse or child.  Exemption amount increased by $12,000 for each dependent of beneficiary.   Minn. Stat. §550.37(10).
MississippiUnlimited, unless over $50,000 paid into policy within 12 months.Cash value exempt against claims of insured’s creditors if insured is not beneficiary.  Exemption limited to $50,000 for value attributable to policy payments made within 12 months prior to attachment or bankruptcy.  MS Code §85-3-11.Yes.Proceeds exempt against claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is not insured.  MS Code §85-3-11
MissouriUnlimited.  $150,000 in bankruptcy.Cash value exempt from claims of insured / owner if beneficiary is insured or person upon whom insured is dependent.  MO Stat. 513.430(8).   Exemption not available in bankruptcy if policy purchased within one year prior to bankruptcy filing.No.  Exemption of cash value limited to $150,000 in bankruptcy proceedings.Proceeds exempt against claims of creditors of insured and beneficiary.  MO. Stat. §377.330.
MontanaUnlimitedCash value completely exempt against claims of owner’s creditors.  Mt. Code § 25-13-608(k).Yes.Proceeds exempt against claims of creditors of insured / owner and beneficiaries.  Mt. Code §33-15-511.
Nebraska$100,000Cash value exempt up to $100,000 against claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is not insured or insured’s estate.  Neb. Stat. §44-371(1)(a) and (b).Yes.Proceeds exempt against claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is not insured or insured’s estate; exempt against beneficiary’s creditor’s if beneficiary is related to the insured by blood or marriage.  Neb. Stat. §44-371(1)(a).
NevadaUnlimitedCash value in life insurance policy completely exempt from execution.  N.R.S. 21.090(1)(k).Yes.Proceeds exempt against claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is not insured or insured’s estate; exempt against claims of beneficiary’s creditor’s existing at time proceeds become available.  N.R.S. §687B.260.
New HampshireNot provided under state law.Cash value exemption not provided under New Hampshire law.  See N.H. Stat. §511:02.Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Proceeds exempt against claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is not insured / owner and has insurable interest. N.H. Stat. §408:02.

Proceeds exempt from claims of beneficiary’s creditors if beneficiary is married woman. N.H. Stat. §408:01.
New JerseyUnclearSimilar Massachusetts statute has been interpreted as allowing complete exemption if beneficiary is third party and beneficiary’s interest in death benefit would be exempt.Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Proceeds exempt against claims of creditors of insured and/or owner if beneficiary is not insured, owner, or insured / owner’s estate and has insurable interest.  N.J. Stat. § 17B:24-6.
New MexicoUnlimitedCash value of policy insuring NM citizen or resident is completely exempt from creditor attachment.  NM Stat. §42-10-3.Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Proceeds exempt from claims of creditors of insured (if NM citizen / resident) or beneficiary – unless contract expressly provides for payment of debts through policy.  N.M. Stat. §§ 42-10-3, 42-10-5.
New York UnlimitedComplete exemption of accelerated death benefits, cash surrender and/or loan value, and dividends against claims of policyowner’s creditors.  N.Y.C.L., Ins. §3212(b)(6).  Exemption inapplicable if debtor actually receives cash loan value and has full control over funds.  Tanges v. Schonbrun, 196 N.Y.S.2d 381 (Nassau County Supreme 1959)Yes.Proceeds exempt against claims of creditors of insured and/or owner if beneficiary is not insured, owner.  N.Y.C.L., Ins. §3212(b)(1).

Proceeds exempt against claims of beneficiary’s creditors if beneficiary is spouse of insured.  N.Y.C.L., Ins. §3212(b)(2).
North CarolinaUnlimitedComplete exemption if beneficiary is insured’s spouse and/or children.  N.C. Gen. Stat. §58-58-95.Yes.Lawful beneficiaries have right to proceeds as against creditors of policyowner / insured unless beneficiary is insured or insured’s estate.  N.C. Gen. Stat. §§58-58-95, 58-58-115.
North Dakota$8,000Exemption if owner is insured and beneficiary is spouse, children, or other dependent relative.  N.D. Code §26.1-33-36.Yes.Exempt from claims of insured’s creditors. If payable to decedent, decedent’s heirs, or estate, proceeds considered as general assets of estate, which may be transferred by insured via will or contract. N.D. Code §26.1-33-40.
OhioUnlimitedComplete exemption if beneficiary is insured’s spouse and/or children, dependent relative, charity, or creditor, or trust for benefit thereof.   Ohio Code §3911.10.Yes.Exempt from claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is insured’s spouse and/or children, dependent relative, charity, or creditor, or trust for benefit thereof.   Ohio Code §2329.66(A)(6)(b).
OklahomaUnlimitedComplete exemption from claims of insured’s creditors.  Okla. Stat. §36-3631.1Yes.Policy proceeds exempt from claims of creditors of insured or beneficiaries.  Okla. Stat. §36-3631.1.
OregonUnlimitedComplete exemption if beneficiary is not insured’s estate.  ORS §743.046(3).Yes.Proceeds exempt from claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is not policyowner. ORS §743.046(1).
PennsylvaniaUnlimitedComplete exemption if beneficiary is insured’s spouse, child, or dependent relative of insured.  42 Pa. Stat. §8124(c)(6).Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Proceeds exempt from claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is spouse, child, or dependent relative of insured. 42 Pa. Stat. §8124(c)(6).
Rhode IslandUnclearSimilar Massachusetts statute has been interpreted as allowing complete exemption if beneficiary is third party and beneficiary’s interest in death benefit would be exempt.Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Proceeds exempt from claims of owner’s and insured’s creditors if beneficiary is not insured or estate.  RI Gen. L §27-4-11.

Proceeds exempt from beneficiary’s creditors if policy provides for non-assignment.  RI Gen. L. §27-4-12.
South CarolinaUnlimitedComplete exemption if beneficiary is insured’s spouse, children, or dependents, and policy purchased more than two years before bankruptcy.  S.C. Code §38-63-40. (However, In re Sims, 421 B.R. 745 (2010), holds that exemption only applies following insured’s death, in what appears to be minority interpretation of similar statutory language).

$4,000 exemption if debtor is insured, or if beneficiary is spouse, children, dependent and policy purchased within two years prior.  S.C. Code §15-41-30(9).
Yes. Proceeds exempt from insured’s creditors if beneficiary is insured’s spouse, children, or dependents, and policy purchased more than two years before bankruptcy.  S.C. Code §38-63-40.Proceeds up to $50,000 exempt from claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is spouse, child, or dependent of insured.  S.C. Code §38-65-90.
South Dakota$20,000Exemption from insured’s creditors unless agreement assigns value of policy to creditor(s).  S.D.C.L. §58-12-4.Yes. Proceeds exempt from insured’s creditors up to $20,000 if beneficiary is spouse, or children.  S.D.C.L. §58-12-4.

Proceeds exempt from insured’s and beneficiary’s creditors up to $10,000 if payable to estate.  S.D.C.L. §43-45-6.
TennesseeUnlimitedComplete exemption if beneficiary is insured’s spouse, child, or dependent relative of insured.  Tenn. Stat. §56-7-203.Yes.Proceeds exempt from insured’s creditors if beneficiary is insured’s spouse, child, or dependent relative of insured.  Tenn. Stat. §56-7-203.

Proceeds exempt from insured’s creditors if beneficiary is estate and estate benefits surviving spouse and children.  Tenn. Stat. §56-7-201.
TexasUnlimitedCash value of insurance policies completely exempt from attachment by creditors or in bankruptcy.  Tex. Ins. Code §1108.51.Yes.Proceeds completely exempt from creditors of beneficiary or insured except if premiums paid to avoid creditors, policy is contractually assigned, or debt involves child support.  Tex. Ins. Code §1108.51.
UtahUnlimitedCash value fully exempt, excluding payments to policy for one year prior to execution or bankruptcy.  Utah Code §78B-5-505(1)(a)(xiii).Yes.Proceeds exempt from insured’s creditors if beneficiary is spouse or child of insured and policy purchased more than one year prior.

Proceeds exempt from beneficiary’s creditors if beneficiary is spouse or child of insured.  Utah Code §78B-5-505(1)(a)(xi) and (xii).
VermontUnlimitedComplete exemption of cash value except in case of credit life insurance.  12 Vt. Stat. §1740(18).Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Proceeds exempt against claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is not insured or estate.  8 Vt. Stat. §3706.

Proceeds exempt from beneficiary’s creditors if beneficiary was dependent on insured as of date of death, to extent necessary for support.  12 Vt. Stat. §1740(19)(H).
VirginiaUnlimitedComplete exemption of cash value from creditors of insured and policyowner.  Va. Code §38.2-3122(1) and (3).Yes.Proceeds exempt from claims of insured or owner’s creditors.  Va. Code §38.2-3122(1).

Exempt from claims of beneficiary creditors if beneficiary is insured, owner, insured’s spouse, child, or other dependent. Va. Code §38.2-3122(2).
WashingtonNot provided under state law for insured or policyowner.Exemption does not apply to insured’s interests in policy.  R.C.W. §48.14.410(3)(a).Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Proceeds exempt against claims of insured’s creditors if beneficiary is not insured or estate.  Exempt from beneficiary’s creditors in existence at time funds become available.  R.C.W. §48.14.410(1).
West Virginia$8,000Bankruptcy exemption of cash value, dividends if insured is debtor or person on whom debtor is dependent.  W.Va. Code §38-10-4(h).

No specific creditor exemption for life insurance cash value.
No.  Bankruptcy W.Va. Code §38-10-4; attachment W.Va. Code §38-8-1.Proceeds exempt against claims of insured / owner’s creditors if beneficiary is not insured or estate.  W.Va. Code §33-6-27(a).

Exempt from beneficiary’s creditors if dependent on insured, up to amount necessary for care and support. W.Va. Code §38-10-4(k)(3).
Wisconsin$150,000Exemption applies if debtor is policyowner and policy insures debtor, debtor’s dependent, or person upon whom debtor is dependent.  Wisc. Stat. 815.18(3)(f). 

Exemption limited to $4,000 if policy issued less than two years prior to attachment or bankruptcy date.  Id.
Yes. (Bankruptcy debtors may alternatively select federal exemptions).Proceeds exempt against claims of beneficiary’s creditors if policy insured individual upon whom debtor was dependent.  Wisc. Stat. 815.18(3)(i).
WyomingUnlimitedComplete exemption as long as beneficiary is not policyowner. Wy. Stat. §26-15-129(a).  Exemption extended to cash value as long as beneficiary is third party in In re Vigil, 74 Fed.Appx. 19 (10th Cir. 2003).Yes.Complete exemption as long as beneficiary is not policyowner. Wy. Stat. §26-15-129(a).  Exemption extended to cash value as long as beneficiary is third party in In re Vigil, 74 Fed.Appx. 19 (10th Cir. 2003).
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